Respiratory Blog

Asthma Rates Finally on the Decline in USA

1 min read

After decades of perpetual increase, childhood asthma rates are finally going down in the United States. These results come from a thirteen year long study started in 2001 involving over 150,000 children. The study was lead by Dr. Lara Akinbami from the National Center for Health Statistics. The results were published in the journal of Pediatrics two weeks ago.
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Helpful New Year's Resolutions for Dealing with Asthma

2 min read

New Year’s Day is the perfect time to reflect on the past year and make plans for the year to come. If you’ve struggled with asthma management this past year, here are five New Year’s resolutions that can help you have a healthier, happier 2016.
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Patients Fight COPD with Music

1 min read

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder or COPD is a progressive disease that obstructs airflow and makes breathing difficult. Fortunately, doctors and patients now have an unexpected new tool for fighting this illness: the recorder.
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Psychological Factors as Powerful as Physical Factors in Causing Asthma, Research Suggests

1 min read

Asthma rates continue to grow around the world. In the US, about 1 out of every 10 children now has the potentially life threatening condition. Although there are still many mysteries surrounding the disease, it’s long been known that physical factors such as pollen, dust, pet dander, pollution, smoke, and mold can both trigger the condition and contribute to its development. But new research suggests that psychological factors such as stress, neighborhood violence, and abuse can be just as influential in asthma development.
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Comic Book Teaches Families About Asthma Medication

1 min read

Physician and cartoonist, Dr. Alex Thomas noticed that the majority of children being admitted into his hospital’s ICU for asthma attacks didn’t properly understand the difference between their asthma medications. So he created a comic book called “Iggy and the Inhalers” to help.
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Benefits of Using a Portable Oxygen Concentrator

1 min read

If you have severe COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder) and low levels of oxygen in your blood, a portable oxygen concentrator (POC) can help you live a longer, healthier life.

Benefits: Oxygen therapy is known to give patients more energy, and reduce the risks of heart failure and lung disease.

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Firecrackers Cause 20% Rise in Bronchitis Cases

1 min read

Two weeks ago, Diwali was celebrated in India. Diwali, the festival of lights, is a Hindu holiday about the victory of light over darkness. It is celebrated with lamps and candles, feasts, gift giving, and firecrackers.

Unfortunately, this year’s firecrackers have led to a 20% increase in cases of pollution related bronchitis in the city of Jaipur.

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5 Hidden Asthma Triggers

1 min read

1 in 12 people now has asthma, according to the CDC. Of those who have asthma, over half have had an asthma attack.

If you’re one of the many people living with asthma, then you probably already know the importance of taking your asthma medication, carrying a rescue inhaler, having an Asthma Action Plan, and avoiding your asthma triggers.

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Puppies and Ponies May Keep Your Kids from Developing Asthma

1 min read

Exposure to dogs and farm animals makes infants less likely to develop asthma later in life, says a new study from Sweden’s Uppsala University.

The researchers looked at data from more than one million Swedish children born between 2001 and 2010. They found that infants exposed to dogs were 13% less likely to develop asthma, and those exposed to farm animals were a full 52% less likely.

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Physicians Develop the Smart Inhaler

1 min read

Over 25 million Americans live with asthma. Many forget to or choose not to adhere to their asthma prescriptions, leading to unnecessary hospital visits and $700 to $4,000 per patient per year in preventable medical costs, according to the CDC.

But a new device by MIT spin-off company Gecko Health is hoping to change all that. Meet the smart inhaler, CareTRx.

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Good Gut Bacteria May Prevent Asthma

1 min read

The bacteria in an infant’s gut could determine whether or not they develop asthma, says a new study.

As part of a project called the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development study, scientists tested 319 babies to see if they showed symptoms of being at risk for asthma, specifically wheezing and having allergies. 22 babies showed both symptoms and were considered “most at risk.”

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Life-Saving Cystic Fibrosis Drug Priced at Over $300,000 a Year

1 min read

The good news: A new drug called Kalydeco has been approved by the FDA to treat cystic fibrosis (CF). It targets the root cause of the disorder, and although it’s not a cure it’s supposed to greatly improve the quality of life for CF patients and help them live longer. (The current life expectancy for most CF patients is in their 40s).
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Doctors Fight to Ban Perfume and Cologne from Hospitals

1 min read

A group of doctors from Quebec have taken up what may initially seem like a strange cause: banning perfume and cologne from hospitals. Why? Because artificial scents have the power to harm patients, particularly those with asthma.
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Your Grandma Could Give You Asthma, Study Claims

1 min read

Asthma rates have steadily increased across the globe for the past several decades. According to the CDC asthma now affects 9.3% of kids in the USA. Now, a new study from Sweden claims part of the problem could be smoking grandmothers. According to the study, if your grandmother smoked during her pregnancy, you’re 10 to 22% more likely to develop asthma, even if your mother didn’t smoke during hers.
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Athletes Have Higher-Than-Average Asthma Rates, Study Claims

1 min read

According to a new study by John Dickinson, head of the respiratory clinic at Kent University’s School of Sport and Exercise Science, athletes have higher asthma rates than average citizens. For example, 70% of the swimmers on the British Swimming Squad have asthma. So do about 50% of cross country skiers, and about 33% of cyclists. The national average asthma rate is significantly lower, a mere 8 to 10%.
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